The Welfare State

April 19, 2010

The Welfare State

Private welfare- charity- is probably older than mankind: assistance for unfortunate members of your herd, pack, or tribe. It is voluntary.

Public welfare came with the appearance of government. Providing it (taxation) is compulsory.

The welfare state goes beyond providing for the unfortunate members of the state. It is designed to provide some benefit to nearly everyone.

The Welfare State was introduced in Germany in the 1880s by Chancellor Otto Von Bismarck. His stated purpose was to make all Germans dependant upon the State and convert them into good citizens: willing taxpayers and cannon fodder for the wars needed to build the German Empire.

Bismarck wasn’t the inventor of this scheme. The ancient Romans kept their commoners happy with “Bread and Circuses”. After World War 1, Bismarck’s ideas were copied throughout Europe and the Americas.

In the “rich world” (Europe and America) everybody pays taxes, so the State is simply redistributing our incomes to make us all feel indebted, and good patriotic citizens. In time we feel that we can’t get by without these benefits. But of course most of us get back less than what we put in. We have to support politicians and bureaucrats with the difference. It takes a lot of bureaucrats to operate welfare programs.

The welfare state has destroyed the initiative and self reliance of the pioneers who settled the USA. Now we seek safety and security in the arms of the welfare state, at great cost to our freedom from the ever encroaching power of the government.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: